Research > Team I:Molecular Mechanisms of Diseases and Target



Name Daoguo Zhou
Research Area My main scientific interest is bacterial pathogenesis, and more specifically, the molecular mechanisms of interactions between bacterial pathogens and their eukaryotic host cells. My research focuses on the cell biology of infectious diseases, in particular intestinal diseases caused by pathogenic Salmonella and E. coli. Based on the life cycles of the pathogens, my research is divided into three main areas: 1) Understanding the role(s) of actin dynamics in Salmonella invasion at both the cellular and atomic level. 2) Studying the molecular mechanisms for the biogenesis of Salmonella-containing-vacuoles, and 3) Investigating how bacterial pathogens exploit the host ubiquitination pathway(s) to induce inflammation. My long-term goals are to gain a more complete understanding of the cell biology of infectious diseases at the molecular level. I have published more than 40 scientific papers in some of the leading journals including Science, PNAS, Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Molecular Microbiology etc. I served on a number of grant review panels in the United States and in China. I am currently the editor for Infection & Immunity, a leading journal in basic research of infectious diseases.
Tel 022-66229900
E-mail zhoudaoguo@nankai.edu.cn
Brief
Introduction
Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China. B.S., Microbiology, 1979-1983.
State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York. M.A., Microbiology, 1991-1993.
University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Ph.D., Microbiology, 1993-1995.

1983-1989: Senior Research Associate, Bacterial Disease Laboratory, Department of Epidemiology, Hubei Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.
Research areas: Surveillance and control of meningococcal meningitis.
1989-1991: Visiting Research Scholar, Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
Research areas: Natural immunity to Neisseria meningitidis in human.
1991-1993: Ph.D. student, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.
Advisor: Dr. Michael A. Apicella.
Research areas: Genetic and biochemical analysis of lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis genes in Neisseriae.
1993-1995: Ph.D. student, Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.
Advisor: Dr. Michael A. Apicella.
Research areas: Genetic and biochemical analysis of lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis genes in Neisseriae.
1996-1998: Postdoctoral fellow, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York.
Advisor: Dr. Jorge E. Galán.
Research areas: Molecular mechanism of interactions between Salmonella and host cells.
1998-July, 2000: Postdoctoral fellow, Section of Microbial Pathogenesis, Boyer Center for Molecular Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
Advisor: Dr. Jorge E. Galán.
Research areas: Molecular mechanism of interactions between Salmonella and host cells.
August, 2000-present: Assistant, Associate Professor, and Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana.
Research areas:Molecular and cellular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis.

Independent Scientist Award, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH). 2007 to 2012.
Faculty Scholar Award, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. 2008-2013

Editorial Board, Infection and Immunity (2014)
Section Editor, Emerging Microbes and Infections (2011-presemt)
Resent Publications (in 5 years)
1.      Bi P, Yue F, Sato Y, Wirbisky S, Liu W, Shan T, Wen Y, Zhou D, Freeman J, Kuang S. Stage-specific effects of Notch activation during skeletal myogenesis. Elife. 2016 Sep 19;5. pii: e17355. doi: 10.7554/eLife.17355. PMID: 27644105; PMC5070950.
2.      Piscatelli HL, Li M, Zhou D. Dual 4- and 5-phosphatase activities regulate SopB-dependent phosphoinositide dynamics to promote bacterial entry. Cell Microbiol. 2016 May;18(5):705-19. doi: 10.1111/cmi.12542. PMID: 26537021.
3.      Li D, Wang X, Wang L, Zhou D. The actin-polymerizing activity of SipA is not essential for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-induced mucosal inflammation. Infect Immun. 2013 May;81(5):1541-9. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00337-12. PMID: 23439302; PMC3648018.
4.      Perrett CA, Zhou D. Salmonella type III effector SopB modulates host cell exocytosis. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2013 May;2(5):e32. doi: 10.1038/emi.2013.31. Erratum in: Emerg Microbes
5. Myeni SK, Wang L, Zhou D. SipB-SipC complex is essential for translocon formation. PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e60499. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0060499. PMID: 23544147; PMC3609803.